Limited Turn Backswing Success

Wed, 09/11/2013 - 12:00 -- Don Trahan

9/11/01 - "We will never forget"

Today I wanted to bring you a story of inspiration from one of our female Surgites. Sue Dickie suffered a horrible accident in a golf clubhouse due to wet floors. I'll let you read the story yourself, as Sue provided a very detailed account of what happened.

It was a long road back for Sue, and she believes that because of the Peak Performance Golf Swing, she's been able to play golf way ahead of her doctor's time table. If she had been a rotational player, there's no way she'd be back playing golf already.

Dear Surge,

Yesterday I went for what I hope is my final checkup with my orthopedist. I had a golf related injury in February. I crashed in the locker room on the way to the "facilities" and dislocated my shoulder, fractured the humerus, and tore a rotator cuff muscle. Yes, ouch. Golf shoes and stone floors (it looked dry, but wasn't) don't mix. Now, five months later, I've played a bit of golf and have been hitting the ball well. The secret? I have consciously let my muscles relax and have limited my swing--I've let my arms go up in the air and not back (into the sacred burial ground). If I let my arm angle back, my shoulder twinges. Thanks for the knowledge that a more limited and upright swing will work pretty well and be comfortable when it counts. If I hadn't been following your method, I  just would have thought that I couldn't swing yet. 
 
Back to the orthopedist: We spoke about The Open and how I was doing with my golf. I told him that I followed a web site that had let me play pretty well, even though I haven't completely healed. I demonstrated what my arms were doing during the swing. He got interested. He told me that he had played with a friend who had calcium in his shoulder joint. The doctor injected him in the locker room right before their game. He said his friend, with his stiff shoulder, played very well for the first nine holes. At the tenth hole, the steroid finally did its job and the man said his shoulder felt great. As you can probably guess, the man's game fell apart. The doctor said the man's swing got a lot bigger, less controlled, and that was the end to it. And, the surgeon broke into a great big smile when he heard the name of your web site and your nick name. It made my day.
 
As an added note: I have had no ensuing problems from playing golf. No pain, stiffness or soreness. I have had problems from carrying things, though--groceries and such. I think I wouldn't be on the golf course yet if I thought I had to do the big shoulder turn with the angled club.
 
Thanks for being there and for being so consistent.
 
Sue Dickie
An American in London

I would like to thank Sue for her candid remarks. I love hearing these types of stories from the Surge Nation. If you've got any similar tales you'd like to share, please feel free to comment below. The whole reason this swing got started was because of my own nagging back pain I was experiencing with a big, rotational swing. I'm happy to say I've been playing pain free golf for a long, long time and it's all because of the PPGS.

Keep it vertical and pain free!

The Surge

If you can't view the YouTube video above try CLICKING HERE. You must allow popups from this site for the link to work.

Comments

scottdrummond@xtra.co.nz's picture

Submitted by scottdrummond@x... on

Interesting to read the comments posted today regarding the recovery from injury and the effect of the cortisone injection. I often find with the surge swing that my first drives of the day are the best, presumably as the muscles are tighter and the swing more restricted. As things loosen up I tend to over swing, similar to the effects of the injection as described and can sometimes lose control of things.

sccomms@aol.com's picture

Submitted by sccomms@aol.com on

Hi Surge,
I wrote a few years back about restarting playing golf after many years of ill health (like you bypass surgery) and winning a major at my local golf club what I didn't mention was due to bad luck, bad judgement or bad bones, I had managed to have back, knee (3 times) and ankle surgery with my knee needing constant support. Where I am heading is that although in pain from all of the above, there is no pain with the limited turn backswing, there is no loss of enjoyment because of pain, so you can just play golf.

A quick note to all who think limited turn means 'limited distance', I have just played a club medal (club championship subsidiary) and shot gross 73 (css71) had an eagle on the forth (325 yards uphill no wind) 15 foot putt for the 2, so no limited distance.

Thanks again Surge

Steve Castle

dasmoon@pga.com's picture

Submitted by dasmoon@pga.com on

Aloha Surge,
Been working on the Peak Performance Golf swing and my irons are right on the mark, but the woods are giving me problems. My drives are carrying 270 and sometime 290 and off to the right. The drive is not a push but more of a power cut, the fairway woods are more of a slice or push. Would like to correct the woods for their hurting me on long par 4 and 5's. I know it is my swing path but have no idea on how to correct it, it is hard to try to swing inside out like the conventional turn swing which is the way to correct slicing. But with the Peak Performance Golf how do you swing inside out with it? You can't so I must be taking the club out and coming down that same path to give me a over the top move. Any thoughts?

Dennis

Russty Kiwi's picture

Submitted by Russty Kiwi on

A couple of things you could try is, ball position a little more forward in your stance, to make contact with the ball slightly later in your arm rotaion. Or if your shafts are to long , as Dave Everitt said, or you are standing too close to the ball , will both give you an out to in swing. We still need to make a 70* turn with this swing, & for me, I like to reach for the ball a bit to get a draw.
Also like Dave said, tempo is important, as we tend to go after the ball more with the woods, as we usually have a long way to go with them. Dont forget to try the search box at the top right of this page for ways to fix a cut or slice.

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

Dennis,

How long are your woods? Try just gripping down an inch or so on the driver and fairway woods and see if that helps. If the clubs are too long, your brain knows it and will automatically throw the club outside to bring it in to the ball on a path where it won't hit the ground first. If you choke down on the clubs a bit, you should get them to where you can take an on-on-on swing path through the ball with the vertical swing.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Dennis,
you have already received several great suggestions and as some have suggested too, there are many actually dozens of tips, lessons and instructions on over-coming the slice/push in the vast library of archived articles. It's like digging for gold. How bad do we want it? I rarely slice the ball any more but before meeting Surge and learning the PPGS I was a master of the uncontrolled headed right shot! So the search box is a great source for you. Use it freely.

Second, have you purchased and studied the "working the ball" videos? In there you'll learn how to draw the ball which at the very least should help correct your banana ball challenge.

I concur with both Robert F. and Dave about the need to have the right shaft length and might I add the correct characteristics. Even though you clearly have a strong swing speed and likely use a stiff shaft, the profile of the shaft may need to have a softer tip section to aid in getting the face square and not a fraction open at impact. A qualified fitter could help with that.

Finally I would disagree that the PPGS is not an inside out swing or that it cannot be because it is more vertical and not as flat and in the SBG. A closer look at Surge just before impact shows a clear angle from the inside. Tomorrows daily video (now available) may help you see that but I will post some pics for proof. Being able to "wait for it" and not dominate the swing with a from the top right shoulder move along with initiating the swing with the lateral bump is key. I would guess too that you are set up open shouldered a may be pre set to slice. That right shoulder needs to be back, down and soft with the "Master set up" position. You also must be parallel left. most of us still line up aimed too far right and that automatically encourages an out side in move. Lots to chew on eh?
Good luck. Let us know.

He's here at the top

https://picasaweb.google.com/CaparasMedia/SwingSurgeon?authkey=Gv1sRgCKO...

Then here at the beginning of his FUS

https://picasaweb.google.com/CaparasMedia/SwingSurgeon?authkey=Gv1sRgCKO...

In the slot :) and from the inside
Again, here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/CaparasMedia/SwingSurgeon?authkey=Gv1sRgCKO...

And then just before impact, here;

https://picasaweb.google.com/CaparasMedia/SwingSurgeon?authkey=Gv1sRgCKO...

Notice how the back/right shoulder and forearm is still back and UNDER?!
That is from correct set up and then the lateral move rather than an over the top move. All easier said and viewed than done. Surge would argue and I would agree that this move is easier from a vertical position at the top than from a flat and deep position.

Dave Everitt's picture

Submitted by Dave Everitt on

There are a few things that I've done lately to eliminate misses right:

!. Had my new 46 " driver shortened to 44". It only cost the price of a new grip. I'm now hitting it longer and straighter because it is a lot easier to square the club face at impact and hit the sweet spot.

2. I focus a lot on having a tempo that allows me to make a smooth backswing and transition to the forward swing. This helps reduce misses both left and right with all the clubs. This also helps to ensure that the bump is a small controlled move and keeps my head behind the ball at impact.

3. Because the driver is the hardest club to square at impact I cheat a little and strengthen my grip when setting up. The best way for me to strengthen the grip just a tad, is to set the club on the ground in front of me before walking into the ball, close the clubface slightly with the fingers of the left hand and re grip with the right. I then square the clubface with a very small turn of the right hand clockwise. The left hand then goes back on to match the right while addressing the ball. This is an easy way to strengthen the grip just a few degrees without changing the overall feel of the grip.

If none of the above are applicable to you there is no shortage of ideas in the site archive.

brian.hale@talktalk.net's picture

Submitted by brian.hale@talk... on

Since saying to myself the word 'Pause' when I am at the top of my backswing my drives have been straight and true. I had been having a lot of trouble with the fairway woods (mainly topping) but since using this technique I have been making good clean strikes on the fairway too. Seems simple and effective; long may it continue!

Dave Everitt's picture

Submitted by Dave Everitt on

I like the word "AND." because it helps encourage a smooth and relaxed transition from the top in the space of a heartbeat. I've used "pause" before but often found myself asking...how long? ....and then rushing the FUS. " Pause" was a swing key for the great Tommy Armour so maybe I shouldn't knock it.

All the best,

Dave

gsherwood's picture

Submitted by gsherwood on

Surge,
I too had a fall a few years ago when a ladder and I parted company. Didn't break anything but landed on my right shoulder and probably did some damage. I never had it checked but it was hard to lift it too high.
I found your website shortly after the fall and after purchasing your system went to work on learning it. I have no pain using the swing and at the age of 61 am playing the best golf of my life. I have been playing off and on for about 50 years and have never hit the ball any more consistent.
I have had lots of rounds this summer at 3 or 4 over par!
Thanks Surge for the swing and for the daily video!!
Gary Sherwood

jprskr@aol.com's picture

Submitted by jprskr@aol.com on

have to use very strong grip to hold on toclub have to have hands very far forward ball goes left as you would guess thoughts to correct

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Is it a pull (going fairly straight left) or does it curve left? This may help you get an answer from the Surge Nation.

jprskr@aol.com's picture

Submitted by jprskr@aol.com on

ball curves left about 50 yards out not a pull

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

When you set up, hold the club out in front of you with the shaft parallel to the ground and adjust your grip such that the scoring lines on the club face are as close to perfectly vertical as possible. You're experiencing a problem I have often had, which in my case was a subconscious adjustment based on my old clubs having progressive off-set. You have the club face aligned closed in your grip. On the ground, it can look square, but if you hold the club in front of yourself with your palms perpendicular to the ground and the shaft parallel to the ground, you'll likely see that your normal grip has the club face closed. Keep a check on that and see if it helps.

Also, which wrist did you break? The left? Your brain may be subconsciously overpowering with the right to avoid reinjuring the left, and thus over-rotating the club through impact.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Not being able to visualize your swing and without more details about your wrist we can only guess. Of course you may now need a lesson and clubs fit for your liability. Trying different types of grips may help too such as those that are larger (jumbo) and softer perhaps. If you have the time, circumstances and finances you could look into some of the above. If not maybe you can turn your challenge into and advantage if it is consistent. If you have a hook most of the time, consistent alignment to compensate may help you play with it. The thing is as Lee Trevino said, you can talk to a slice but a hook won't listen. You say you HAVE to grip it as you do because of the handicap, correct? If you could correct your hold on the club my advise would be much more in line with Robert F.'s. It may be that you are holding the club lower and the lie angles are now too upright which contributes to the 'lefts'. Flatter lies and making sure your club face is square to appearing a bit open at set up may be enough to carry your shots straighter. Again, if the challenge is permanent a fitting and lesson may help you do the best with what you have. A PPGS teacher would be able to see your hands, alignment, over all set up and swing up close to give you the adjustments and advise you need.

rpcp11@sbcglobal.net's picture

Submitted by rpcp11@sbcglobal.net on

Is it alright at the top of the backswing to have your back to the target with
a limited 3/4 turn that is not in the sacred burial ground? Where should the left shoulder be in relation to the ball at the top of the backswing (right handed)? On the FUS, should the right shoulder be held back so you don't come over the top? Roger Peterson (rpcp11)

Dave Everitt's picture

Submitted by Dave Everitt on

It is a very small turn. The back should be at a 70 degree , not a 90 degree angle to the toe line. You are doing a rotational swing if the back is ever pointed at the target. The shoulder to shoulder line, points somewhere to the left of the ball, at the top, depending on ball position. A deliberate effort to hold the right shoulder back, when starting the FUS would encourage me to hit a pull shot. One of my setup checkpoints is to make sure that the right shoulder is back where it has to be at address. A small lateral bump to trigger the FUS and a smooth transition, helps to keep the right shoulder from coming over the top without thinking about holding it back.

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

In relation to the ball is a difficult thing to say, but in relation to your chin, the left shoulder should be well forward of it. Your left (forward, right for left-handed players) upper arm should hit your chin around the end of the bicep. If your shoulder is getting all the way to your chin, you're over-swinging. It's an issue I deal with from time to time, as my backswing can get overly long and I know it is when my chin hits my shoulder instead of my bicep.

dasmoon@pga.com's picture

Submitted by dasmoon@pga.com on

Robert Fleck - My driver is 44 1/2 inches and 3 thru 7 are standard decrements. The shaft is strong regular with the tip giving the strong variance. My irons are Project-X 7.0 pro stiffness and ball flight is either straight or about a three yard fade.
I had a chance to look at my video and noticed that the irons I have the move that Surge was demonstrating in his video on in the Slot, whereas my woods were to upright on the plan. Indicating that I could only get to the impact by redirecting the club from the outside in. I began to position my wood swing more on a correct angle as my irons were swinging and it straighten out the problem. Was so focus on up the tree that it was to vertical. Thanks for the replies and help. Really appreciated the advice.
Dennis

jprskr@aol.com's picture

Submitted by jprskr@aol.com on

What is impact if the hands are set way ahead of ball(6in) at address. Hands r at left hip. What happens to shot

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

I'm really not sure exactly what you're asking.

First, in a standard setup, the butt of the club should be pointed at your forward hip socket, roughly half way between the center-line of your body and the outer edge of your hip bone. The shaft of each club is built with a varying amount of lean depending on the loft and length of the club, so that if it is soled squarely with the butt of the club pointed at your forward hip socket, you will set up to each ball with it progressively further back in your stance from driver (essentially in line with the hands) to wedges (slightly behind the midline of the body). Given the geometry of your body and the clubs, this should place the base of your right thumb approximately below your chin for every club, and your swing should naturally return it to that point.

If you return to impact with your hands significantly ahead of that point, you will tend to start the ball out to the right, and depending on the speed of your hands and whether or not you had the club properly square to begin with, it may fly straight right or hook back to the left.