Surge's Pre-Shot Routine | Swing Surgeon - Don Trahan Peak Performance Golf Swing

Surge's Pre-Shot Routine

Thu, 01/03/2013 - 08:00 -- Don Trahan

A pre-shot routine is something that should come naturally due to repetitive practice. It's what starts the path to consistent golf. Steve McGee sent in his question via the blog. He wanted to know what I do for my pre-shot routine and when I think of all the different aspects of the setup.

Things such as "preloaded heavy right (PLHR)" or the "accordion effect" are elements of the setup that I often talk about, but the real key is that these are automatically programmed into my routine subconsciously because of years of practice.

I go to an inside sports dome almost 5 times a week and take 4 to 5 clubs; 9 iron (all the time, reason it's my 90 yard club, the distance to the back wall of the dome), a long iron, short iron, hybrid, 3 wood or driver. My two problems are distance (I am working on that and will probably get an online lesson from Dave Seeman). The other is chunking - I noticed on Surge's videos that he grounds his club before he swings for all clubs. I haven't seen or heard him talk about where he grounds it - i.e. distance from ball. On trying this (keep in mind he changes the distance on all clubs), keeping them square and keeping still has improved the chunking. However, the sequence of what you should do from walk in to finishing the T is still a mystery. I know they are all in separate videos and in detail, but nowhere is there a simple list (without all the detail) and this is what I am interested in. 

Example: where does he do the PLHR at walk in, at accordion, on the way down in the accordion, just before back swing? Each time the weight change effects the swing and chunks happen or don't or go away (you top the ball). 

I hope you or someone can help me.

Steve McGee

The goal is to practice your routine to the point where it comes as natural as signing your name. We want to get into an automatic system. Sometimes in my mind, I may have a different swing thought on whatever I'm working on for that day, but my routine will stay relatively consistent regardless of what's going through my head.

First, I start behind the ball and I find my spot. After I've got my target picked out, I walk from directly behind the ball to in front of the ball where I begin to imagine my aiming lines on the ground. The first thing I do from there is lift my club up in the air. I always take it with my right hand and lift it straight up in front of me. I do this to be sure the face is inline with the club. Also, you want to make sure the clubface is perpendicular to the ground.

Once I get the club setup properly in my hands, I put it down perpendicular to the aiming line. The leading edge of the face will tell me where the ball position will be. Steve wanted to know when I sit in to my preloaded heavy right position. I do it when I get my feet down in the right spot for the shot. I normally stand up a little bit, then I get PLHR after I go back down using the accordion effect.

Now I'm ready to begin the swing. I don't like a lot of waggles, but most of the time I do one or two to make sure I'm working on the proper rotation in the mitt and up the tree. Now, Steve mentioned that I ground the club behind the ball. That's true, but I'm never pushing the club into the ground. It doesn't even press the grass down. Once I get everything set, I go! 

Your routine is yours. You are the one that must decide what you want emphasized in it and what may need extra attention. For instance, if you're worried about alignment you may need to dedicate time in your routine to that. At some point, it should just flow and become natural. From starting behind the ball into the shot, I'm not counting each step I've listed because it just happens within 5 seconds or so. If you visualize your swing before the shot or "feel the swing", you should hit the ball within 10 seconds because it will most likely already begin to fade out of your mind if you wait much longer.

Make your routine any way you want, but it needs to be established at some point in time because it will only help with the concept of consistency. Routine is great because it takes you out of the conscious and into the subconscious, which is where you can maintain the feel of the swing much more naturally.

Keep it vertical!

The Surge

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Comments

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

You'd think after 24 years of playing, I'd have worked out my preshot routine, but this is still something I fight to remind myself all the time. I get rushed and just step in and swing, which most often leads to discovering that I was aimed right of my target because I didn't take the time to align myself properly, or I find that where I'm not standing the correct distance from the ball, but won't back myself off and reset. I'd be a hell of a good golfer if I could just get myself to do what I know to do every time. ;-) Sound familiar to anyone else?

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

If you watched me play you would think that I had a very consistent pre-shot routine because I go through the same motions every time at the same pace.

The fallacy is that my mind is not in the same place on all shots. Until I can manage to think the same way on all shots I will continue to be great at the "impossible" shots and very, very poor at the "easy" shots.

I've said it before but when I verbalize my intentions before a shot the difference is undisputable, but I am never likely to stand on a wide open par 3 tee box and talk about a strategy for a shot. On the other hand on the impossible shots I am almost certainly going to think and talk about it (to myself if nobody else).

It's always interesting to me to watch Bubba Watson play when he has a mic on. The way he talks to his caddie, and the way he thinks, on every shot (no matter how simple) is the way I only approach tough shots. If they invented a golf game where every shot had to be hit at a certain trajectory and around, through, or under the trees I would be able to play with anybody.

I think my problem on easy shots should be correctable, but it certainly has never been corrected so far.

Kevin McGarrahan's picture

Submitted by Kevin McGarrahan on

Very familiar, Robert. So much so that this is what I have been working on the most for the last two months. I get so eager to hit the ball that I tend to forget to pick my spot to align to the target - the swing, the swing, I must make the swing!! Oops! It didn't go where it was supposed to go:<() Oh, yeah, I forgot to line up properly.

Another little problem with all of that during practice is just putting my feet in the same place for every swing instead of going through the routine. Sure, my feet are always on the same line to the target, but ball position changes because I move it to a slightly new place to avoid the slight divot I took, if I took one. So, I have to force myself to do the routine EVERY time.

SimplyGolf's picture

Submitted by SimplyGolf on

During our 2 weeks of lousy weather here in NorCal, I decided to focus on one thing.

TIming worked out well, as I had just had a pre-shot routine lesson with a very gifted teacher the week before. When the storms hit, I was stuck indoors, and spent those days working on the PSR. Heard takes 21 days to build a new habit.

At the range today, I noticed that it did indeed "help". Bad shot or good shot, No worries, no pressure. Simply walk through the PSR, make small tweakings along the way if needed, and let it rip.

BTW-Derek Hardy's advice to wait to set your feet only after you've checked the target, is spot on. Between Don, Dave, and Derek, I think a good PSR can be built right. It matters.

Edit: Kevin, I was just thinking that NO real PSR was indeed my PSR. Grooved insanity. I've been at this game only a few years, and had improvised a very inconsistent/ ineffective PSR.

Glad to have some meaningful input from PPGS and a local pro. Lesson note: PGA teacher was ok with my swing, PPGS elements notwithstanding. How about that. But one look at my pre-shot routine...I realized again how helpful it is to have competent, invited input from an outside source.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Don't think I ever thought seriously about a routine until I came across Surge and got this involved in learning a method for more consistently good golf.
As I suggested after our happy new years video, having a routine down and one that invariably includes alignment as part of that system is crucial.
As Don said, and I agree, it depends on what we're working on. For example as most you know from the new alignment video, one of the things we can do is use either an extra club or our alignment stick along our feet on the golf course BEFORE any shot as we set up to make sure our alignment is correct. Of course as Surge says, this is perfectly legit, even in tournament play but of course we remove the club (or stick) and toss it aside before taking our swing at the ball. Let me stop here and ask if anyone has done this? Shock me and tell me you do please. I am going to guess that few if any of you do this. I do it all the time when I am working on alignment. (which is frequently). The other suggestion is to lay the club down by the footline after you've hit a good shot to a wrong place. Surge says he sees few if any follow this great suggestion either. Does anyone reading this do that? Curious? I have and do this often also. What helps me graduate to the level of not doing either is having a golfing partner (usually my wife) double check my alignment BEFORE I take my swing. Mentioned again on the new UAV is how this is common on the LPGA and with some on the PGA. If it is common among pros shouldn't we do this too if we have a golf partner that understands parallel left and correct alignment? Of course we should. Now it may sound like all these ideas for on course alignment correction might take a long time and make me tough to wait for each shot but I do all this stuff fairly quickly. Nobody has to wait for me on the tee, fairway or green. And frankly, I don't give a flip if others think me odd for using aids before swing or after. Not worried about how I look to others. I get to my ball asap and starting with my laser check the distance real quick (BTW, Don uses a laser too first thing). I then decide which club and the shot shape in a few seconds all before I walk into the ball. If I am using a stick as an alignment prep, after I pick my target and aiming line I set my aid parallel left, quickly check it from behind and walk in. After setting my feet I toss the stick and complete the rest. (accordian, PLHR, et). When I play frequently enough I do play best when I have a routine similar to the one Don has.

The main thing that I always aim to consistently do in my routine is one, have a visual of my ball flight and result pictured and two, Having the right feel in my fingers and hands just before taking the club back.

As I suggested the other day, having a regular routine that becomes more like our signature is a good goal for all to have in 2013. Consistently excellent alignment is another.

One of my goals for 2013 is to attend one of Don's schools and have him check my alignment and say Robert your alignment is spot on:)

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

I wouldn't risk it without asking first Robert and have a copy of ruling 8-2a/1 with me. Ha ha. After seeing the squirrels acting as rules officials in action trying to figure out some rulings this year at the tournament in Chattanooga I certainly wouldn't risk it.
http://www.ehow.com/video_4945656_walking-around-golf-ball.html?cp=1&wa%5Fvlsrc=continuous&pid=1&wa%5Fvrid=7985bf75%2D8b...
http://golf.about.com/od/rulesofgolf/a/rfaq_alignaid.htm
Two different opinions.
I would definitely ask before play. The officials weren't too much interested in listening to someone telling them they were wrong.
Luckily I wasn't involved in any of it.
14-3/10.3
Use of Rod During Round for Alignment or as Swing Aid
Q. During a stipulated round, a player uses a rod to check his alignment or his swing plane. What is the ruling?
A. The player is disqualified under Rule 14-3 as the rod is unusual equipment and such use, during the stipulated round, is not permitted.
Carrying the rod is not, of itself, a breach of a Rule.
But:
8-2a/1
Club Placed on Ground to Align Feet
Q. A player places a club on the ground parallel to the line of play to assist him in aligning his feet properly. Is this permissible?
A. Yes, provided the player removes the club before playing his stroke. Otherwise, a breach of Rule 8-2a would occur.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Yes on the putting green it is true that alignment aids are not allowed and as your second reference says they are allowed on the course in general as long as it is done PRIOR to and not DURING the swing. This was also confirmed in the UAV by Surge. In your last reference it says "during a STIPULATED round." So this seems to indicate that it is not allowed if this is stipulated in the rules for that round or tournament. Otherwise your second reference applies.
The using of a club or alignment aid or club as an alignment aid prior to or before the swing and then tossing it aside is something that Don started doing with me during a personal round I was honored to have with him the week he came to Las Vegas at the Paiute Golf course. It has helped me tremendously. I have found that once I get it down it has enabled me to become consistent in getting lined up to the point where I do it less often and then can switch to just laying my club down after the swing to see how I did with alignment as Don has also recommended time and time again.
Again, I am mostly recommending it because it helps instill good alignment habits. You actually get used to seeing yourself parallel left. I truly believe that is the #1 reason most right handers aim too far right (and vice versa for lefties). Our eyes fool us as Don re emphasizes in the new video.
When you consistently practice getting parallel left as Surge recommends (with an alignment aid BEFORE the swing -see his video) it becomes ingrained and more natural every time you walk in without the aid.
Trust me Steve, I know few if any will use Surges recommendation. That's why it might shock him to see my alignment correct at a school. This is similar to the loft and lie adjustment I preach about frequently. How many will get it done soon? I wonder.
Oh, and I know your R9's are and exception.

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

They are R7s..
P.S. Alignment rods after the shot would be almost useless for either people like me that flare one foot more than the other or people that turn their foot during the swing and follow through which is a whole lot of people.

adel's picture

Submitted by adel on

Hi Robert,
Although I do not contribute to the daily blog, I have been reading and watching on a daily dasis all videos and discussions related to the PPGS and practicing it for the past 5 years according to all avilable tools.
I'm practicing indoor now until April or May to ingrain all Don's teachings.
I beleive that every aspect of the whole swing process must become a routine not only the set up.
We can set up perfectly parallell left or right to the target line (toes, knees, shoulders and eyes), with some practice, using an immaginary target line, including ball position, without the use of any markers. I quickly learned to do it without markres and sticks on an indoors unmarked mat and a target spot on the net ahead. I think we should rely on our senses to ingrain this routine, it only requires attention...
About lie angle adjustment, can't we adjust the lie angle of any particular club by setting up more or less upright to control the way that club sits on the ground using accordion move and avoid the bending process?
I have another question with respect to routines.
I have been finding it advantageous to do a small forward press before initiating the swing, it helps me turn my shoulders around my core into the mitt instead of using only my arms up from the onset (my problem).
Is the use this forward press falls within the PPSG parameters?
There is so much related info on the search engine that I could not focus on a definite choice.
Please help.
Many thanks.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Adel,
I would be happy to discuss the points you bring up. By the way I seem to recognize your name and it is very cool that you have been quietly following along for about 5 years and continue to read and watch daily. You must benefit and take action on some of the advice given by Don and family. In any case you like most of us here love golf and share a passion for it.

Forward press. Though it most often related to putting. Some have a forward press as a trigger to start their normal swings too. In normal circumstances we want to pre-load right so if the forward press does not interfere with that it seems it could be fine.
Parallel left and alignment. Like everything else Adel, whatever works for you is fine. We do know that Surge and his teaching staff say nearly all students at every school and lesson they do fails to have good alignment. And Surge says that 90-95% of all swing faults are caused by poor alignment. If you are the rare person who is getting it down without ever using alignment sticke or a club by the feet than awesome and congratulations, really I mean that. So they advice I gave was for the rest of us who are open to finding a way to join the few who want to break away from those failing majority that Don and his teachers continually remind us about. I do agree that ingraining it into our senses is a great goal. It is mine too. However most of us continue to be fooled by our eyes even after we become skilled at alignment and will be aimed right or wrong and hit the ball well to a wrong place more often than not. Golf is a game of misses. He who misses least wins:) Be comforted though realizing you probably are among the majority in that no matter how often Surge says we should always spend some of our practice time using alignment sticks/clubs, even as most pros do week after week on the PGA and LPGA. Yes they too are ingraining it but many, especially on the LPGA still have their caddies standing behind them to confirm or correct their alignment before every shot from tee to green. Most of us don't have caddies or friends to help so a simple club before and or after for a qick second along our feet clue our alignment. Again, up to you.

Lie angle adjustments. I really appreciated your honest response to this one because I think your thinking likely sums up the majority who feel it is no big deal and they can set up and swing more or less upright to adjust their swing through impact. In fact that is what most are doing. Some with great skill. they know that they always seem to hit that 8/9 iron to the right nearly every time so perhaps even sub-consciously they automatically either aim more left and or toe in the club face and or lower the hands or maybe a combination of compensations. The advice for adjusting our lofts and lies to accommodate our natural and usual swing is given by the most experienced minds in the golf club fitting business including Tom Wishon, Ralph Maltby and Lynn Griffin. I have gone over the reasons multiple times and the research is available for all to read.
A quote from Tom Wishon is interesting and I'm sure likely true on this blog,
"It's probably safe to say that fewer tan 10% of all golfers have ever been fit for lie, and had their clubs adjusted accordingly." And, "It is a critical aspect of golf accuracy." It cost around $5 per club (depending on the shop and fitter to have each club dynamically fit. Any how be comforted that you are among the 90% that will not be effected by this advice.
While it is true that much of what we say is just our personal preference and opinion, true lies of our clubs are either right or wrong and do effect our swing and and our results. It's physics, not conjecture.

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

I'm going to disagree slightly with the other Robert on the element of a forward press. Surge has actually talked about this in the past (don't recall if it was in a daily or one of the paid instructional videos) and it made me change my setup and swing for the better. I used to use a forward press to start the swing, as well, but as Surge said, that means that you're beginning your backswing with a move in the opposite direction, adding unnecessary room for variation. Most likely, you're setting up with the butt of your club pointing at your belt buckle, right? Adjust your setup so that the butt of the club is pointed into your left pocket, the position you're getting to with the forward press, and you'll find much less variation in your swings, and a much easier time getting started and staying out of the SBG.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Okay, another one of my answers was lost in the twilight zone. I gave a comment already to your thoughts on the forward press and don't see them now. What ever. I basically agreed with you and as I stated I don't use or recommend the forward press but it seems to work for some.
BTW are you already in Texas or is that still in the works?

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

I'm on the road a week from Monday, but my clubs are already on the way. I was going to keep them with me, but there are too many things I NEED in the car with me and the dogs. Maybe sometime we can meet up at the range, though, and I can try out that club with the Enlow grip. ;-) Also, my fiancee does work for Southwest Airlines, so soon I'll be able to fly back to Vegas (or anywhere else SWA flies) for free.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Robert, Maybe next Thursday if you're still available we can get together at the range to hit some balls, we'll see. Sounds great you've got the flight hook up:)
We'll keep in touch anyway. You'll always have family on the blog here no matter where life takes you.

david@dwarchitect.com's picture

Submitted by david@dwarchite... on

I have not seen any comments related to ball position when putting. I am left eye dominant and would like to know if this affects where I put the ball when putting.
Watch your videos daily and recently had new clubs by one of your fitters. I can honestly say it has made a huge difference.
David Wulff
Lakeland, FL

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

There are so many putting strokes that can work that it would be next to impossible to call anything "the right way to do it". I am left eye dominant and I have the ball even with my right eye, and I am a good putter. One of the few things on a golf course I would say that about.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

David, while I am not left but rather right I dominant, general advice for ball position is somewhere just forward of middle to just off the inside of the front foot. This means that experimentation is needed to find your optimal ball positioning. I find that too far back promotes a pushed putt and too far forward a pulled putt. Other factors are all about your putting style and even your putters loft. When you putt do you tend to de-loft the putter with a noticeable forward press and even hands a bit forward in your stroke? Do you allow the club head to release or hold the face at a given angle through impact. ie Straight back straight through or in to square to in again? One thing Surge and his chosen putting teacher and student Jack Moore based on golfing great E. Harvey Ward is putting up on the ball. This again requires finding the best placement forward in the stance. You may wish to add this putting video to your library and i highly recommend it. "putting Secrets" found in Surges Shop.

shortgamewizard's picture

Submitted by shortgamewizard on

Robert's comment about the Jack Moore putting video illuminating E Harvey Wards secrets is right on. A great video and cheap at the asking price for the insights.

Steve is also correct that there are many ways to putt. Being consistent and confident results in good strokes.

So far as the eye dominance and the ball position I would go about it from the opposite direction. To hit the putt so the putter head swings up from impact on through means the putter head's position must be dead bottom center of the stroke.

To find this point use a plumb bob, aiming stick or what ever else works and hold it to the top of the sternum. Where it points should be on the bottom of the T line perpendicular to the aim line. The putter face should line up to this line. Second is to hold the plumb bob to your eyes so it points down at the ball. I prefer to have neither eye over the ball as it can affect where the bottom of the putting arc is.

It also matters less if the weight is on the right, left or middle. The bottom of the putting arc is still important to getting the best performing roll on the putt. The dominant eye does affect how much the head needs to rotate in order to see the cup. For the right handed player more head rotation is needed to see it.

Surge has written about the way the eyes see the target differently and how it can affect the aim. I look at the hole generally to reinforce the distance and speed the ball needs to travel to end up 12-18" beyond.

The most important key to making putts is to have the eyes parallel to the aim line. This is "seeing the line." Great putters do this all the time. Good putters some of the time and poor putters rarely. As Surge continually stresses, aim, aim, aim. Good golf is rarely achieved if you leave home with out it.

ruis.steve@gmail.com's picture

Submitted by ruis.steve@gmail.com on

Surge, I have to disagree with your comment "A pre-shot routine is something that should come naturally due to repetitive practice." The problem is that pre-shot routines do not come naturally and the reason for this is the constant tinkering people do with their swings. Folks should write down what they think their pre-shot routine is and then never violate it. If they want to change it they must change the list first and then commit to always doing it with the change. Any violation of the routine requires a "do over" with the routine done correctly. This is the much shorter path to effective dedicated practice than just hoping that one's pre-shot routine will become consistent through practice.

kjmduke@aol.com's picture

Submitted by kjmduke@aol.com on

Love reading everyone's input. After 3 years of having to hit the idiot button after 15-17 holes of lousy play to correct the same dumb thing, I finally forced myself to do a routine. Without it, I approach and think that I have mastered it and so do not have to repeat and everything slowly degrades to mush. I have worked on making a lot of the pieces standard such as grip, alignment, accordion, but now add a half rotation to feel my upper body moving together and feeling my knees flexed with only a slight turn in them. The result is huge, I go from shooting low 90's to low 80's just by mentally engaging my mind and body for a few seconds before the swing. Again, that is my unique problem issue that I needed to take control of and make a change in my routine
One other thing I have adapted is from Surge. I have never seen him swing until he takes a quick flick of the club to start his swing. In some respects it looks like a wrist cock but I find it provides a reminder of the rotation of the arms/hands/club into the ball at impact. I have found it gives me a starting point for the swing, instead of standing and freezing like a statue. More important for me, it serves to tell my muscles to get through impact where I can often tend to be lazy and leave the club open. I definitely can hear and see the difference as I find the club zooms through the hit and I find my eyes concentrating on the club hitting the ball at the last point of concentration before starting the swing. Kevin McCarthy

Dragonhead's picture

Submitted by Dragonhead on

Played half a round today. First time on the course for 10 days. It was a log jam after 9 so had some putting practice and headed home.
Set up routine is becoming second nature now. Today was the day my febrile thought was put to the test for real. Something Surge said, had struck a chord. So from the start I tried it. Did it work? Did it! I had noticed something and had my caddy [my wife] check that I was not going outside the ball to target line on the BUS. I was not. So previously, I had been coming inside too early.The first thing I noticed was, my eyes had told me, that I was going outside that line on the BUS, but I had not been doing so!!! Now this action made my BUS and transition into the FUS and up to the T finish seem almost second nature. There were a couple of 'strange' shots, but my shots were consistently dead straight. Pitching, chipping and putting were superb. Accurate on every chip and pitch. All using my 'new' take away 'feeling' that I was 'looping' the club back and through.
Another surprise, was I took an older 8 iron with me to compare it to the one I use presently. What a revelation that was. Maybe it was the new swing routine or that club suits my swing, but on chipping, it will remain in my bag. I only hit a couple of shots with it and they were long and accurate. Putting I made a slight change to my 'claw grip' and it worked a treat.Whereas recently I had had trouble with distance control, today I was amazed at how good it was. A 45foot slightly curving and at the end downhill putt to 3" for a tap in and others dropping from 12' to 15'. So a happy chappie. Just off for Pork noodles for lunch. Hope Dick Lee is sleeping hahaha~! Keep hitting them more consistentlty longer and straighter. DH after first holes in 2013 in drier and less windy NZ ; - ]

shortgamewizard's picture

Submitted by shortgamewizard on

Did anyone notice the interlopers starting about 1:13 and then moving to the tree just left of the yellow slide resulting in way too much fun up to 2:42 or so?

reedclfd's picture

Submitted by reedclfd on

SGW: Ha ha! I thought I was the only one that got a chuckle when they showed up. Worth watching again!! R2

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

I saw those cute buggers too. I am very visual so I don't miss much. it usually requires me to watch the daily at least twice to refocus on Surge and his points. I do find myself wishing I had a house in his neighborhood with his backyard.
Lovely. Living in the desert as I do I always enjoy our trips to the mountains and forest. Likely going to retire in a like area, God willing.

SteveO's picture

Submitted by SteveO on

I want to thank “THE SURGE” for answering my questions. His response has cleared up a lot of things – most notability when to PLHR. “Thank You”… One thing I would like clarification on, are his thoughts on (AND WHERE) he grounds his club (distance from ball to club). It appears he ranges (looking at his videos) from maybe a quarter of an inch (short irons) to about 3 inches for his driver. Just for kicks I tried it at the doom (with the driver) and it improved my accuracy and distance. It’s true; the ball just gets in the way of the club on the down swing.

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

I'm not sure what Surge would say but you are correct that he starts the takeaway with the longer clubs further behind the ball.

I noticed very soon after trying to use the PPGS that the head start of getting the club head to the toe line, that is built in with the ball position of shorter clubs, was more important than I ever would have thought possible (and lost with the driver). Even a couple of inches of head start make a world of difference. It's why some people have success with a forward press or, as Surge does, setting the club more behind the ball.

Setting up more behind the ball gives the head start. The drawback can be that some people lose the feel of the impact point that our mind has at address. Not as important with a driver as it would be for a ball on the ground, but still takes a little higher skill level.

If you watch closely every single thing Surge does just before the takeaway is giving him more head start at getting the club head to the toe line. What appears to be random fidgeting is really getting a head start under close scrutiny. Starting with the waggle but up until the club starts away.

adel's picture

Submitted by adel on

Thank you all for your responses, I always respected your well informed opinions and replies, including everybody else's on the blog (too many to mention) that help me, among many others, clarify and better understand, as improving my golf game is my daily passion.
The limited forward press I mentioned seems to relax my swing (I'm a lefty), presetting heavy left seems to make me stiffer on the backswing, knowing that I should stick to Don's parameters ...
I mentioned that I've been following the PPGS for 5 years, it's only been about one year before Don left the other site.
Regards.
Adel

SimplyGolf's picture

Submitted by SimplyGolf on

#3

Kedick62's picture

Submitted by Kedick62 on

Surge have watched your u-tube video several times and noticed you kick your right hip back during your setup.what is this all about don't recall any of this in any of your instruction.thanks your videos are great.ken edick