In Your Own Words: Flying Front Elbow Fix | Swing Surgeon - Don Trahan Peak Performance Golf Swing

In Your Own Words: Flying Front Elbow Fix

Thu, 06/11/2015 - 13:00 -- Don Trahan

I love when Surgites around the world send in emails about successes they're having. Today I want to share a story from Ray, who expressed that a flying front elbow (first time I've ever heard that term!) was causing him to lay the club off in his back swing, which spells disaster for a vertical swing!

Ray realized that his front elbow was kicking out during his takeaway into the catcher's mitt, which was leading to a really flat backswing. He started to hone in on getting the clubhead into the catcher's mitt and then continuing up the tree. (If you aren't sure what I mean when I say catcher's mitt or up the tree, check out the Fundamentals of the PPGS and you'll learn fast!). 

He started breaking his takeaway into two parts and it helped him get more vertical. I don't have a problem whenever a student finds something that works, as long as it remains in the parameters of the Peak Performance Golf Swing fundamentals. So, I will warn Ray and anyone else who may try his tip that you need to stay cognizant of the fact that the swing needs to flow together. There shouldn't be any stopping and starting during the swing, as it could lead to really bad timing habits that could be hard to break.

I like Ray's tip for a drill, but remember that the swing must all move together, with no pausing.

Keep it vertical!

The Surge

Comments

Robert Fleck's picture

Submitted by Robert Fleck on

Hey Surge, Good advice as always. Of course, there's a classic drill from your original PPGS basics that would also help with this problem. The handshake drill. Imagine that you're in your setup position and you want to shake hands with someone to your right.

westwood's picture

Submitted by westwood on

Hi, Not sure how to ask Surge a question so hoping this way work! The Vertical Swing has literally transformed my enjoyment of golf. I have had clubs fitted by Doc which are worth every penny-especially the shorter shafted driver. My only problem is with my fairway wood. I can hit the 6 hybrid every time but have lost my confidence in the fairway wood. The problem may be that because I often thin it, I feel that I want to 'sweep' it and probably end up with my weight on my back foot for too long. I know you are busy but a daily blog on fairway woods would be very much appreciated. Thanks. I. Dutton. UK