How Senior Golfers Can Increase Distance | Swing Surgeon - Don Trahan Peak Performance Golf Swing

How Senior Golfers Can Increase Distance

Thu, 12/13/2012 - 08:00 -- Don Trahan

One thing that most senior golfers struggle with is distance. As we age, our bodies slow down and we lose flexibility. Both are critical to swinging a golf club with any sort of power. But, even if we can't hit the ball as far as we did 5, 10, or 20 years ago, we can utilize the proper equipment in order to offset the decrease in clubhead speed. 

Drew Danko is 73 years old and looking for more distance with his fairway woods. He wanted to know what my clubhead speed was and what he can possibly do to hit the ball farther. 

Hi Surge,
Even though I am an advocate and user of your approach, I went to a local golf center the other day to have my clubhead speed assessed. My reason for going was to determine why, at the age of 73 and in good shape, I cannot hit a 200 yard shot off the fairway with a 3 or 4 wood even when I swing them well.
 
The swing speed recorded for me was 72 to 77. The pro said unless I can get it into the 80s, it will not be possible to reach that 200 yard goal. I can live with that, but it made me curious about what club head speed Surge reaches with his 3 and 4 woods. So, I would like to hear from Surge about that plus any thoughts he may have on how us senior citizens can achieve greater clubhead speed. 
Thank you for all your good work,
Drew Danko
The one thing I really liked that Drew said in his email was that he "can live with that." He may not be able to hit it 200 yards, but at least he's accepted it, which means he can concentrate on other parts of his game. I'm at 95mph clubhead speed with a 3 wood and close to 100mph with the driver. But, I know that 10 years from now, that won't be the case. So, what do we do to combat this?
 
We've got to understand that when we get older, we slow down. If you do any activity today that you did 5, 10, or 20 years ago, like riding a bike or running, you can probably still do it but you're probably not doing it as fast. As we age we're able to do similar physical activities, we just lose our speed when doing them. We slow down. I'd be willing to bet that even walking from the house to the mailbox is a longer trip than it used to be. 
 
If we can't perform daily tasks at the same speed we once did, than we probably can't swing a golf club as fast or hit the ball as far. So, we've got to adjust for it. the PGA of America has a program called "Play it Forward." This means that you play the right tees for your skill level. Many courses today probably need more tees because of this. I even think that senior tees are still too far back. Even I don't play the back tees anymore! If a course is over 6700 yards, I'm not playing the back tees because it's just too long for me, at 62 years of age.
 
To answer Drew's question about what he can do to gain more distance we must shift our focus to his equipment. All of our certified fitters agree that seniors are constantly being sold clubs that are way too long with clubheads that are way too big. They also put the sweetspot on the clubface out near the toe of the club. The more the club designers put the sweetspot near the toe, the harder it is to square the club up. They're making clubs for golfers who make bad swings, which is noble. But, everyone here at this website is getting better and wanting to improve their swing, so these clubs aren't made for you. The clubs are actually working against you. What we need is the sweetspot in the middle of the club.
 
I've been hearing a lot of success stories after telling seniors to use their wife's driver and 3 wood to see what happens on the course. What I hear is that nearly everyone hits it better. That's because ladies clubs are built with smaller heads with lighter shafts and grips. They're also not as long. All of these elements make them easier to hit. 
 
In many cases, our certified fitters are fitting our students with 12 and 14 degree drivers. They're also fitting their 3 woods at 17 and 18 degrees, which twenty five years ago was close to the industry standard.
 
When you lose speed, you need loft to get the ball in the air with the right shaft and the right weight for your swing. I think it's critical for seniors (including me) to understand that we need more loft with smaller heads. Don't be afraid to go against what you see on television because here we're teaching you to improve your swing so you don't need a club that is built for flawed mechanics.
 
Many golfers can hit a driver and 3 wood off a tee with no problem, so if you're struggling doing that then you know it's time to get more loft. Remember, smaller heads, more loft. You'll find that you hit it more solid, straighter, and longer. Get to a certified fitter soon and make the proper adjustments. Trust me on this one!
 
Keep it vertical!
 
The Surge

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Comments

CHASTEL's picture

Submitted by CHASTEL on

Most of us overstate the role of equipment ,whatever sport it be .The piece of equipment you must work on unremmittently is your own body .You must exercize your body every single day .I myself am 78 years of age .I am of average build :5 Feet 9=1,75 m and 160 pounds =72 kgs )I exercize every single day God is good enough to grant me :3 to 4 hours (When I am not on the golf course ).Stretching ,Strenghtening ,Cardio training (Exercise bicycle and Stepper ).I adhere scrupulessly to the training program of the American Coach Jo DiVISALVI "FIX YOUR BODY ,FIX YOUR SWING "
I also work on my fast twitch muscles with different pieces of equipment
The result is that my clubhead speed measured daily with the SWING SPEED RADAR is 95MPH with the the Driver (10°5 loft )and 85 MPH with the 3 Wood (13° loft ) and I can still play from the back tees against "youngsters "half my age .Also I follow a strict diet and don't drink beer ,nor Coca Cola and not much alcohol nor "hot dogs "or "Icecreams " .
My good scoring relies most on my short game which I practise in my basement every day (Chipping ,short putting up to 9 feet ,long/lag putting from 25/30 feet
In my younger days ,the motto from AVIS was "We Try Harder "That's what you are up to when you come of age !

Dale Moser's picture

Submitted by Dale Moser on

I agree that our body is the piece of "equipment" to which we must pay more attention - get in shape, stay in shape. I disagree that "Most of us overstate the role of equipment..." Most of us play with equipment that is ill-fit, or not fitted at all. And your equipment will tech you how to swing. it is the most important training aid you have. So, yes, physical fitness and flexibility will make us better golfers. But don't understate the the role of equipment, It matters a lot. See you nearest PPGS fitter. (And have a beer after your next round).

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

I couldn't help but smile and think about the Bobby Jones movie where his grandfather comes over and the maid asks if he wants a Coca Cola, to which he replied "There is nothing in the Bible about Coca Cola".

I don't think beer is in there either.

I know that being stronger helps with distance but I don't believe it does as much as most people think. There is a lot going on in a golf swing that has very little to do with strength. When I first started playing 9 years ago I was MUCH stronger than I am now (not even a close contest) but I can hit the ball just as far now as I could then, and straight a little more often...Sometimes. LOL
I could probably work on my upper body strength a little more and maybe pick up a few yards but probably barely enough to notice. I do almost no strength training anymore but a lot of cardio work.

Of course people that are truly out of shape would get more gain out of it.

Cowboy in a kilt's picture

Submitted by Cowboy in a kilt on

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to have fun.

Remember, if you give a man a fish, he will be able to eat for one day. If you teach a man to fish, he will sit in the boat and drink beer all day.

Dick

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Physical fitness that includes proper nutrition and exercise is important. Correct equipment does make a big difference. There really should be no argument by those open to reality. For both myself and my wife, proper fit golf clubs have made a helpful difference. In the case of my wife, through trail and more trial we have got her into the right combination of shafts and heads for her game. She has been only playing for about 3 years and only the last two with any regularity. Now she asks me what day(s) we'll be playing each week.
Of course it is her longer game which is the most challenging for her as the clubs are longer and less lofted. So most recently, I got her into a driver with 15* of loft and a 5 wood with 19* loft. We also cut her softer shafts to the correct length. Her driver is 41 inches and 5 wood only 39 with all others appropriately stepped shorter down to the sand wedge. Not surprisingly it is actually that 56* sandy that she plays the best.
One thing I have found for myself is that as of late with an ailing right shoulder my club head speed is down a bit so I use my 5 woos instead of the 3 currently and get the ball up and down field easier.
We all should look at our equipment and our over all health and strength indeed. Aside from my arm I am one one the healthiest 55 year olds you are likely to meet. Still blessed to play golf.

Walburghian's picture

Submitted by Walburghian on

I was thinking of posting this article, when you made the topic the subject of your next lesson. I am 68 yrs, played off Single figures for 30 yrs and am incapacitated since July with a knee problem, which requires "knee replacement". I can no longer walk more than 200 yds but, with the aid of a Buggy, can still play acceptable golf. Firstly, I have been using your method for nearly 3 yrs. Secondly, I have had to "throttle back" on my power, as I have a brilliant Training aid - if I put too much pressure on my knee it hurts! The result has been that I have lost c.10/15 yds but I am more consistent, am "peppering the flag" from 150yds in & my pals can't believe that I have a bad knee. I have had to make some adjustment with the "bump" though but managed this by concentrating on the "Forward Upswing" to stop the occasional pull to the right. I mention this to encourage anyone & everyone that you can play good golf with a Handicap(no pun intended), I can still get the ball out there 200yds or so on the fly & wish to thank the Surge again for saving my golf career, as I would have given up with my old swing.

jon in lincolshire's picture

Submitted by jon in lincolshire on

My parents moved 10 miles from me a year ago and my dad joined the same club as me, so i now get to see him twice a week & observe his swing. Hes 74 ,been playing 50 years now and had heart surgery 4 years ago as such his handicap went up to 24. He wasnt enjoying his game so I finally persauded him in the summer to come with me and try out senior shafts at a shop/range and to stop trying to hit his 9* driver with a stiff shaft ! After 2 hours of hitting different clubs drivers 3 & 5 woods we narrowed down to a 5 wood (17*) that he was just continually hitting long and straight but longer than his driver so he bit the bullet and took it and his scores came down and was competitive in the weekly swindles no matter who he played with, Happy Days a smile back on his face . I didnt stop there though , my brother in law is a pro (Mark Mouland playing on Champions tour in U.S. next year , finished 3rd at q-school if you want to look) and my dad new there were some taylormade heads in his garage that he doesnt use so he bought them back and i tried him out with a regular stock shaft and a senior flex aldila . After some observation of flight and adding some magic dust (lead tape) to the head he now hits a 10.5* RBZ asfar as I hit my R9 11.5* off the T and thats about 220-240 yds not bad for a 74 year old ! Now if I can do something with his irons lol
Moral of story Dont be to proud to try something different my Dad never believed the higher loft would make that much difference net alone he was using too stiff a shaft, im now getting asked by other partners about shafts and lead weight to help them
So thanks to Don for my game & Doc for the knowledge F&G all, have a great holiday season from the U.K.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Jon,
Glad your Dad finally listened and took some advice on trying a different shaft and loft. As mentioned it often has to with length too and magic dust and playing with the swing weight is good too. Bottom line, it's what works that matters and continuing to find a way to enjoy this game inspite of physical changes and challenges over the years (some good many well...). I too am determined to flow with the ever changing future too. I am always looking for the healthiest alternatives to keep on truckin'.

Kevin McGarrahan's picture

Submitted by Kevin McGarrahan on

In the 1971 movie, “Hannie Caulder,” Robert Culp teaches Raquel Welch to shoot a gun. Part of that training involves a stick with a thin rope attached to rocks of progressively increasing weight. She had to wind up the rope and roll it back down 30 times; then a bigger rock is attached and she starts all over. The purpose was to strengthen her wrists and arms to handle the kick of a .45cal pistol. I enjoy watching that exercise LOL!

In the early 80’s, when I was playing my best golf, I used this exercise to great effect. Lately, I have realized that my wrists have been getting weaker. Consequently, I recently resurrected this exercise and it is helping quite a bit with my propensity to have random, uncontrolled wrist movements during the swing. Instead of rocks, I have a small hanging flower pot that I started with empty. I have a bucket of stones from the lake (also good for practicing skipping) that I am using for the increasing weight. I modified the exercise shown in the movie to isolate it to the wrists and forearms by placing my elbows on the rail of my deck while performing it.

One caution: make sure you use a smooth rod or wear gloves to avoid splinters. I have a 15” piece of the top rail (about 1-1/4” dia.) from my chain link fence. I drilled a hole in the middle to attach the rope (3/8” nylon) so it wouldn’t slip when winding up and down.

I hope some can find this useful. Firm wrists are a necessity. PMG and keep it vertical!

Steve Smith's picture

Submitted by Steve Smith on

I had a concrete block on a rope with a stick handle in my bedroom from the time I was about 11 years old until I got out of high school.

Later I built some machines that worked off of the same principles.

Dragonhead's picture

Submitted by Dragonhead on

Kevin,
I read your comment before going for a swing on the range matt in the 'backyard'.I thought of something then and there. Then thought no more about it. Then during my swing session [no balls just clubs] I noticed something, which reminded me of my previous thought before the session.
I find myself occasionally [much less frequently these days, thankfully], not gripping the club firmly enough. Remember the grip requirement of gripping up on the club grip and NOT gripping down at set up and throughout the swing? Well I did it before the swing session, thinking, "I wonder"! Doing it during the swing session IMHO gripping up with the fingers towards the palms of my hands, firmed up the wrists! It didn't stiffen them, but there was much more control of the clubhead. No flicking at the 'ball' area etc.
Some time ago I commented on how I strengthened my grip by using one of those multi-coloured hard sponge practice balls. These I found perfect while watching TV or reading. I put the ball in the palm of the hand and curled the fingers as we are taught to do by Surge in starting our grip and pressed upwards with the fingers.See what you think Kevin. Hope it helps DH

Kevin McGarrahan's picture

Submitted by Kevin McGarrahan on

Thanks, DH. I've used the hard sponge ball as well to strengthen the grip, but found that it didn't do much for the wrists. I manage to keep a firm grip; however, I tend to move my wrists around too much which is why I do the rock-on-a-rope exercise.

garystevensen@comcast.net's picture

Submitted by garystevensen@c... on

Seems to me then, at 68 years old, I should go back to my Macgregor JNP irons, (circa 1990) which were more lofted than my much newer Taylor Made irons.
What say you?

Dale Moser's picture

Submitted by Dale Moser on

The "more loft" mantra is really about the driver and fairway woods. While it is true that your old 5 iron and the Taylormade 6 iron have about the same loft, it doesn't matter what number is on the bottom of an iron. It is all about the loft.

But for drivers and fairway clubs, with slower swing speeds you have to have a higher launch angle to get the ball up in the air, keep it up in the air, and carry farther. For most seniors the 3 wood needs to go into the closet. The lowest lofted fairway club in your bag should be a 4 wood (16.5°-17°), or even a 5 wood (18°-19°). For optimum carry distance with the driver when your clubhead speed is in the 80-85mph range, you need a 14°-15° launch angle. You're not going to get that with a 10.5° lofted head.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

True for most Dale however, oddly enough I now hit my best drives with my 9* xstiff driver. It has a lot to do with the over all characteristics of my shaft and my swing. My angle is attack is such that I hit up on my teed up ball with the driver and it gives me great trajectory and flight most of the tim. My swing speed is only about 98. Of course my example may not be typical.
As for the irons you are right. Lie angle would actually be the wisest thing for all golfers to check and most neglected.

Dale Moser's picture

Submitted by Dale Moser on

Your swing speed is not slow. it is well above average. At 98 mph and an upward angle of attack you can handle a driver with less loft. It should be noted that the actual loft of the vast majority of drivers is 1°-2° higher than the number on the bottom of the club. That may or may not be true for yours. The brand name manufacturers know that most guys need more loft than they think they do. So, the tendency in manufacturing is to err on the side of more. And, yes, your example is not typical.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

True, 98 is not bad. I can still get it out there pretty good. My point was simply that ones angle of attack needs to be considered or factored in when selecting loft. Also you are correct that the lofts vary both because they just aren't what is stamped on the club and because they know that ego's continue to steer amatures (they like to say they can still hit that 8,9 degree driver when it's actually 10*), particularly men to go for less loft than they really need. Too, aside from Tom Wishon's, nearly all drivers are designed with vertical roll radius. So only at the the exact center of the face is the club 10* if stated to be 10*. Above the center it may be 11* or even close to 12*. Knowingly or not most ams hit the ball better if it is struck just above center. Of course that's because there is more loft above center. Likewise we hit it lower if struck below center. Aside from slightly topping the ball( or hitting it just below the balls mid point), it is also because the actual loft of that same 10* driver is closer to 9* or less below the club face center. Dale, I'm sure you likely know so this stuff but it may be helpful for others reading our exchange.
As a club fitting hobbiest (not professional) I find the study of all this quite interesting and have invested much time the last few years reading and club making and testing on my own. Both Tom Wishon and Ralph Maltby have been great resources along with others including Lynn Griffin. Love talking about this sort of thing.

EDIT. Are you a fitter? My apologies ahead of time if anything I'm saying offends. I just read from another comment you fit clubs. Either way, I enjoy your comments and we're glad to have you here. Thanks

Dragonhead's picture

Submitted by Dragonhead on

Robert, Health food? The other day [for 2days running] we had pig's trotters for lunch [our main meal of the day].They are excellent so I am informed, for joints,tendons and the skin. Now this is a food often discarded by many as Yeuk! My wife cooks them with added garlic [fresh] ginger[sliced fresh],cooking wine,peppercorns,Soya sauce,etc. She first boils them, then gets rid of the bristles, adds the above ingredients, adds the cooking wine and puts them into a slow cooker. When tender, she removes the bones. Then makes a sauce using sugar and Soya Sauce, boils it with the trotters. Or a lot of Chinese just boil them and dip the flesh into Soya Sauce, garlic.....etc We like it with rice and whatever vegeatables we fancy [cooked separately]. Occasionally I am "forced" to eat it with seaweed soup : - ( hahaha. I like the 'cold' spiced broccoli with it garlic and Soya sauce and coriander. Yummy!
Now to equipment. After having a brilliant 6holes the last time on the course. The only negative point was my drives were longer but not that high. So I have taken out the old wooden driver and the Mizuno one. Stood them side by side with their heads square and the lines parallel to the ground. I stood them on an eggtray [it was conveniently handy]. I had taken my grip on my present driver, which was recently shortened. Noted where the hands were on the grip and put a strong thin elastic band at the base of my top hand. I then put a band on the grips of the other two drivers as they were leant against a wall. It was immediately evident the differences in the angle of the shafts. Will have a swing choked down to the levels indicated and see what if any differences there are. The head of the Mizuno is smaller than that of the r7 and the PingZing blonde wood is smaller again. The Mizuno is 1/2*degree more lofted than the r7 I have no idea what the loft on the PingZing is [yet] It will be interesting to see how they perform for real.
Funny the stiff shafted G2 woods are my favourites. Hmmm!
Healthy food, good, sensible exercise, plenty of fresh air, what more could we ask for? My two old mates Ti-ming and Tem-po sure made a lot of difference on Thursday's outing. No doubt about that.
Stay well, and keep on hitting them straight and consistently. DH
Try some trotters for you shoulder, perhaps.

Terry Medley's picture

Submitted by Terry Medley on

We never called them Trotters, just Pigs Feet. My father and many of the other elders of my clan seemed to love them. We of the younger group never acquired a taste for them. Perhaps it was in the preparation or cooking styles. I recall them also enjoying dishes made from the brains. It seems little was discarded in those days, at least by my clan. As I recall, it didn't taste like chicken.

As for golf, I haven't played in a couple weeks, but hope to tee off tomorrow around 11am. It should be almost 40* by then, rising to 46 for a high. The weather in N.E. Ohio has not been pleasant of late. Any day warm enough to play contained rain, but I'll take the rain over the snow anytime, much easier to shovel.

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

I must be from Ohio in a past life. your sense of humor is perfectly mine too most of the time. Rained here today. Don't mind the rain either. Lived in a rain forest on the north coast for 3 years:) Cindy and I walked 9 yesterday. 65 and cloudy. Bet that sounds like spring to you.

Dragonhead's picture

Submitted by Dragonhead on

Hi Terry,
A slang term for pig's feet! We had them after WW2 UK during the period of rationing. Like all things, it is how you prepare them. Most folk are put off by the fat. When they are cooked, the fat rises to the top of the liquid it is slowly cooked in, and is skimmed off. It can be ditched or rendered into lard for later use. It all depends on individual preferences.
As for the flavour? I enjoy it. It helps the old joints etc.
Your father and the elder generation all ate them. Lots of them with fat included. Funny, the younger generation don't eat them, or Pig's heads and brains, like we did in China. Are they themselves any healthier for not doing so? It doesn't seem to have affected we of the 'elder generation' ; - )
Hope that your game tomorrow lives up to expectations with the weather behaving itself. Here around 70degF today and then the wind took over! I would take rain over snow. In Germany 33years ago with sub zero temperatures and one hole covered with sheet ice all around the pin, I had the best 9holes I had ever had up until then! The 'tough' soldier playing with me, quit after 9holes whimps! heh heh heh. Look forward to you having had a good round. DH

Cowboy in a kilt's picture

Submitted by Cowboy in a kilt on

Ok guys, I guess it is really true, some things never change. It is great to be back and to see that we can still find a way to work golf into our food blog. Just like the old days. Now I am starving, and I had to go raid the fridge.

Thanks!

There goes the food budget,
Dick

resumez@cox.net's picture

Submitted by resumez@cox.net on

Coach - and all others:

The memories this invokes!! Of when I was a smile child, temporarily living on my Granfather's farm. He generally raised 3 Hogs each year and had a barter deal with a local Black clan (3 generationsof them!)that did the butchering and curing. Granddad got about 4 hams, about half the bacon, pork chops, sausage and lard. The butchers got the rest.
We never ate the "trotters" ! But the butchers claimed them -- along with the brains and the snouts!
At the end of the day, we had a big abtch of deep fried chitlins --- Mmmmmmmmmmmm good!! Specialy when yu do not know what they are made from ! :<

Amos

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

DH, which model of Mizuno was that driver?
BTW, here's a cool article by Ralph Malby for you and any other golf nuts out there. That would be most on the blog! lol!!
http://www.ralphmaltby.com/357
The best book I've added to my collection on club fitting is his, "The complete Book of Golf Club Fitting & Performance" It also has measuring tools for loft, et in the back that can be photo copied and used in temporary place of spending $$$ on equipment. You can find it here;
http://www.ralphmaltby.com/home

Got to spend time with the wife now:) Peace

Dragonhead's picture

Submitted by Dragonhead on

Robert,
The Mizuno clubs are Mizuno "Finalist V-01" Driver 11deg, 3W-16deg, 5W-22deg, irons 4-SW, all with 'Original Carbon Shaft, Regular Flex. Hope that helps?
I should have kept quiet about the pig's trotters [pig's feet to Terry Medley and others], ended up with pork and seaweed soup for lunch. I know why people of my wife's race have different shaped eyes!ie, Just look in the mirror and imagine seaweed soup ; - ) She thought it was funny. hahaha. She is a gem.
Off for another swing on the deck mat. The wind is blowing a gale here at the moment. Good practice conditions for a stable stance heh heh heh!
Enjoyed the Maltby website, will read it more later. Thanks DH
PS Checked out lad(d)ies clubs on line. Interesting.

Russty Kiwi's picture

Submitted by Russty Kiwi on

Havn't had a pig trotter in ages, but do love a good lamb shank, now and then. Liver & bacon with onions and gravy, is a favourite , as is corned cattle tougue in a filled roll. Would have to draw the line at tripe & onions though.
I see a good wee practice net on trade me for 30 bucks resv, if you are still looking.You could pick it up in Lower Hutt. I am still looking for a decent mat for my driving range

NeilofOZ's picture

Submitted by NeilofOZ on

Drew really needs to get properly fitted, I am 68 with a light frame and can average 180-190M off the tee & fairway with a three wood, sometimes 200M, which is well over 200yards, even with a swing speed in the low 70's. When in
Carolina this year, Dale Moser change the shafts in all my woods with instant improvement, also change my mid irons to hybrids with good results. So Drew
get fit, get fitted, get the short game and working and start getting results, Lol.

dsopchak@twcny.rr.com's picture

Submitted by dsopchak@twcny.... on

Serge, Been using your swing for a couple years now. No pain and very consistent. Could you spend a few minutes discussing the "ring the bell" part of the swing? Thanks
Dan

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Here you go Dan.
Click this;

https://www.swingsurgeon.com/daily-video-tips/ring-bell-and-bump

This should cover it quite well Dan. FYI, I found this for you in under five minutes simply by using the search box. It is invaluable and your best "free" resource for every possible golf question you could dream up. you see Don has covered them all. Many like this one dozens of times to one degree or another.
All I did was put in the words 'ring the bell' and three pages of archived articles and videos came up. Again, go to the top right hand side of this site and you see it. It's just below the 'log in' box and is blank with a magnifying glass.

x_rayh@yahoo.co.uk's picture

Submitted by x_rayh@yahoo.co.uk on

I am 65 and use a tom wishon 13 degree driver and hybrids 2-6 the first iron in my bag is a 7 iron. I cannot hit a 15 degree 3 wood never able to get it in the air the hybrids are much easier to hit and get up in the air. Have been using the ppgs for about 3 years and my handicap has come down from 24 to 15.

resumez@cox.net's picture

Submitted by resumez@cox.net on

Dick;

Title line says it all -- I am normally not very emotional -- but theis one brought out a couple of tears.

Amos

Cowboy in a kilt's picture

Submitted by Cowboy in a kilt on

Surge

Great video and topic for today. I have listened with great interest for the last two years when you and Doc talk about how poorly most golfers clubs fit them. I have always had a great deal of interest in how golf equipment works and how it can be made to work better. About 2 months ago Dick's Sporting Goods opened 4 new stores in the Oklahoma City area. I was fortunate to be hired as the club tech in the golf department of our store. I have been getting trained on doing fittings, and club repair. My shop would make Norm Abrahams jealous, if it were a wood working shop. I think about 75%, or maybe more, of the people who bring their sticks in are swinging clubs that just don't fit them. Most are too long, the lie angles are way off, and a lot of them might as well be swinging a broom handle as a shaft.

While physical strength is very important, in golf as in life, we have to play golf with the body we have. If the arrow is bent, it does not make much difference how good a shot you are with a bow. If I had not found you and the PPGS two years ago, I would still not be able to play a round of golf. Your swing gave me back the game of golf. I had to accept that I will never average 300 yards on my drives again. Like Drew said in his email to you, I can live with that. I have learned that with your swing, the proper attitude, and equipment that fits me, I can still be consistently at the 260-270 range, and in the fairway. Better there than the dreaded "long and wrong."

I have had some interesting encounters with golfers while working at the golf shop. The good book says something about pride coming before the fall. That is surely true in golf. Recently a repeat customer brought in his 71 year old father. Dad had been having a problem over the last couple of years, which had been getting progressively worse in the last several months. He has been hitting more and more hard slices and blocking the ball way right. I had him bring his sticks into the store so I could take a look at them. He was hitting a 9* driver, with a stiff shaft. Forgot to mention he was playing the Pro V-1. I had him warm up and then hit some balls on the monitor. He was launching balls with 4500 rpm right side spin. His driver club head speed was 90 mph. Not bad for a man of 71. He had gotten used to hitting his drives well to the left of center so they could fade back onto the fairway. I used your line, and asked him if he likes his slice. He said no, of course not. I asked him why he keeps playing for it then. When I suggested he might be better off trying a higher lofted driver, a regular flex shaft, and asked him if he would be willing to try the Bridgestone B330-RX, I thought he was going to punch me in the face. At first he said he would give up golf altogether if he had to make those changes. His son finally talked him into at least trying what I had suggested. Lets just say that the results were incredible. After his first couple of shots, his average drive was up 30 yards, and the hugh side spin and resulting slice were gone. I gave him the address for your web site, and told him to start watching the videos. They both came back in last week and Dad apologized for getting mad at me. He said they have been playing at least 3 rounds a week together since they were in the first time, and he could not remember when he has had more fun playing golf with his son. It felt really good to be able to help give someone the gift of being able to enjoy golf again, like you gave me back my game. I hope he will get interested in the PPGS, and make the switch.

You should go to bed every night content, knowing how much difference you have made in so many people's lives.

Thanks Surge, for all you do for us,
Dick

Terry Medley's picture

Submitted by Terry Medley on

Thanks for passing this on Dick, via Steve. It was a nice gift with my morning coffee, which I have passed on to another twenty or so. Here is a recently received repete from last year which is very moving. I will be off shortly for a cold weather game of love/hate golf. Hope you enjoy this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=Vnt7euRF5Pg&vq=medium

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Thanks Terry. Amazing. Every one who is God fearing should watch this.
Those who aren't really,really should watch this.

Cowboy in a kilt's picture

Submitted by Cowboy in a kilt on

Have a great round.

That was incredible. Great to know there are still a lot of folks out there who feel the same as I do.

Thanks for sharing that,
Dick

resumez@cox.net's picture

Submitted by resumez@cox.net on

Coach:

AWESOME!! How on earthrdid you find this? You obviously have too much time to spend surfin' the 'Net!

Keep hitting htem STRAIGHT and LONG -- and a very good round

Amos

resumez@cox.net's picture

Submitted by resumez@cox.net on

DICK;

ALL too true!

Amos

Robert Meade's picture

Submitted by Robert Meade on

Not particularly proud to say that like some others like DH I have eaten nearly everything! Married to an Asian for 19 years and actually living in Indonesia for one year, I learned that they throw nothing out. The only thing I drew the line with was blood. Whether as gravy or sausage would not partake.
Funny, many parts that might get thrown out by many in this country are loved in other countries. Chicken feet,head/brain lungs,guts,stomach,liver,heart, whatever. Now re-married and with Cindy these past 10 years (full on white Polish/italian American girl, lol) diet has been much more typical of the western USA. No more chittlens for me. Still love the hot spicey stuff though. Normally get my fix when i take my kids to lunch or dinner. Tia is my favorite. Similar to Indonesian cuisine. Oh, and Cindy does like it hot, only more along the lines of Mexican.
Recently my diet has gotten increasingly more vegetarian. Less and less meat and almost no dairy aside from the occasional ice cream. Less sugar,alcohol too. Feeling healthier every day. Goals are a more alkaline PH (7.4) and less inflammation. Yes I am now doing most of what is recommended if one is serious about maintaining or reclaiming optimal health and wellness. Most wait until a doctor tells them they must change. Lost both my parents to cancer. Plan on bucking the trend. Oh I'll die alright but hopefully on the golf course at 95. Can't control that but I can control my diet and lifestyle. Getting use to the daily green smoothies and lifestyle. I wasn't that far off to start with so not that tough to do.

Brady's picture

Submitted by Brady on

But I love blood pudding! I also will try anything once. I been to 14 countries so far.

My wish as well is to die doing what I love. Albeit, not golf - I'm a huge mountain biker.

Getting out of the typical American diet can only do you good. Cause it's horrible compared to the rest of the world. I am very happy to say I have not touched fast food in 6 years!

Terry Medley's picture

Submitted by Terry Medley on

Growing up, I was a very picky eater. Coming from the mid west, I was pretty much the meat and potato kind of person, depending on the meat. Serving a year in the Philippines and 3yrs in Hawaii changed that. I grew to love not only Asian cuisine but pretty much all cuisines. The real thing is different from the Americanized versions but still quite enjoyable to partake of, generally once a week or so. The one thing I never tried in the Philippines is balut, and another I tried, but could only do a couple bites of was dog, in the form of burger meat. I didn't know what it was at first. It's nice to have buddies. I have an uncle who enjoyed blood pudding lunch meat/sausage, which I tried as a teen but did not care for at that time.

Balut:https://www.google.com/search?q=philippines+balut&hl=en&tbo=u&tbm=isch&s...

Terry Medley's picture

Submitted by Terry Medley on

Although I do have more spare inside time, with the cooler Ohio weather, I can't take credit for this one Amos. Another golfer friend passed it on to me a couple days ago and I remembered seeing it last year during the Christmas season. It is one that is well worth seeing each year though.